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What to look for: Warning signs of suicide




As we reflect on the loss of those impacted by suicide, we embrace the fact that no one truly knows the struggle of someone else. As a resource, we want to provide you with helpful tools should you or someone you know struggle with thoughts of suicide.


What to look for: Warning signs of suicide:


Immediate Risk

Some behaviors may indicate that a person is at immediate risk for suicide.

The following three should prompt you to immediately call or text 988 (988 Suicide & Crisis Lifeline) or call a mental health professional.

  • Talking about wanting to die or to kill oneself

  • Looking for a way to kill oneself, such as searching online or obtaining a gun

  • Talking about feeling hopeless or having no reason to live

Other behaviors may also indicate a serious risk—especially if the behavior is new; has increased; and/or seems related to a painful event, loss, or change.

  • Talking about feeling trapped or in unbearable pain

  • Talking about being a burden to others

  • Increasing the use of alcohol or drugs

  • Acting anxious or agitated; behaving recklessly

  • Sleeping too little or too much

  • Withdrawing or feeling isolated

  • Showing rage or talking about seeking revenge

  • Displaying extreme mood swings


Knowing the signs and risks can be helpful in motivating you or someone you know to seek out support. If you or a loved one is struggling do not hesitate to reach out for help. Crisis intervention is available and can be reached utilizing a call or text to 988 Suicide & Crisis Lifeline, calling 211, going to your local emergency room, or dialing 911 for emergencies.

Please note, this blog should not be used for crisis intervention.

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